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Unsuccessful Suicide Story

Unsuccessful suicide attempts are a tough topic to talk about. We have been discussing suicide and suicidal thoughts in these last blogs and Warfare Parenting Podcast. Today, Lori Wildenberg shares her personal experience with her daughter’s unsuccessful suicide attempt.

This is Lori’s story.

Lori shared, “You know this, this is a tough topic. In the last episode, we talked about some of the signs demonstrating that perhaps the depression is getting deeper and could lead to suicide. And my daughter had some of those signs when she was younger, in middle school; she wrestled with an eating disorder. By the time she went to college, I had thought she was emotionally healthy. She started well. Then there was a lot of pressure with the particular major that she was in. It was a high-pressure major. So she had all the stress of the workload of college. She was also working a little bit, earning some extra spending money. She had some friendships that were getting somewhat difficult. All of those stressors started to keep piling on and piling on. 

Then the feelings of I would say she was feeling alone, or even feeling worthless, or perhaps feeling like she wasn’t ever really loved. All of which, I mean, if she were to stop and think about it, but your brain isn’t right when you’re going through these things, right? So she was wrestling with a lot of things and it started to get too much. When I would call her, at first, I could hear the sadness in her voice. Later, I found out that she was crying like every night. I didn’t know this. When we talked, she was four hours away, so it wasn’t like we were close. But we still had the phone, and I could hear the sadness in her voice. 

But, then I have to tell you, the scariest thing was hearing her voice void of emotion when I talked to her. That scared me. It was like my daughter would be like, I don’t care if a good thing happened to me, it doesn’t matter if a bad thing happens to me, I don’t feel anything. This was incredibly frightening. Well, after one of those calls, I got pretty scared, and I made a plan to go and see her, and I was going the next day. 

Well, the night before she attempted to take her life, she ended up telling me later. But I didn’t know that she had an unsuccessful attempt at the time. If you read my book, you’ll learn a little bit more about that. But I’d instead not get into that part of it. It is in the book because my daughter describes her own experience, and I leave that up to her. The book’s title is “Messy Hope Help Your Child Overcome Anxiety, Depression or Suicidal Ideation”. 

So when she came home with me, then the next thing was we went to the doctor. She got on a prescription to help stabilize some of the things that were going on with her and then made a plan for doing some therapy. All of those things help. Yet I think that one of the things that helped the most was graduation which was maybe six months from then. She ended up graduating from college. Then many of those triggers, the things triggering her, fell away, and she continued to get healthier and healthier, and everybody’s different. But I do know everybody needs help, and as parents, we can be a tool to provide more hope and help for our kids. God can use us in that

About two years, maybe a year and a half after her attempt, she wrote a blog about her experience and depression. She wrote it to help somebody else who may be feeling like she was, about 18 months to two years ago. The blog was a tough one to read. I almost felt like I was going to be sick, you know, to hear the things that she was thinking and the way that she even thought about herself. It was very troubling. But when I read her blog, God started to impress upon me that her blog was so important for young people to read. 

But there was another side that parents needed to be equipped. Because young people today are struggling with so many mental health things, one in four will end up with a mental health diagnosis. This is what God had; part of her healing journey was writing her blog and participating in writing messy hope with me. I have to say; I wasn’t sure about God’s plan. I was really scared about his plan because I thought, Lord, what if this because I’m asking her these questions, and she’s drawing up these past emotions? What if this puts her back into that black hole with all the layers? Right? What if this starts to heap dirt on top of her again? You know, I’m afraid to do this. And I kept checking in with her; how are you doing? Are you okay? 

Finally, at one point, when I asked her, because I was really scared, and I asked her if she was alright, she went, “You know, it’s really hard, mom, for me to relate to that person that I was then to who I am today.” Wow, there’s the victory. 

There is much more for you in this week’s Warfare parenting Podcast. Please listen here today.

You can also buy Lori’s book, which shares many applications, tools, and more. For more information, please visit her website here.

LINKS & RESOURCES

WEBSITE: https://www.LaineLawsonCraft.com

DOWNLOAD FREE: Warfare Prayers – Laine Lawson Craft

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FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/LaineLawsonCraft

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/LaineLawsonCrft

IG: https://www.instagram.com/LaineLawsonCraft

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/lainelawsoncraft

https://lainelawsoncraft.com/warfare-prayers/

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You Can Beat Anorexia a Hope-Building Story

Tina Yeager is a licensed mental health professional with personal experience with anorexia. Today I will be sharing her journey of overcoming anorexia. Tina shares her hope-building story on her victory in overcoming anorexia, tips, and ways to help navigate healing.

It started with middle school age junior high school. She didn’t fit in and wasn’t popular. Someone suggested that I might be a little chunky and need to be thinner to be included. Precise details on food, and I thought if I could be smaller or thinner. Maybe they would let me even be in the background.

She became very restricted with what she ate. This lasted about eight years. She never reached the worst stage where you lose your period. In middle school, she starved herself so severely that her elbow was the most significant part of her arm. Her hips stuck out, so only bones appeared. Her skeleton poked through her clothes. 

She ate under 1000 calories a day. Then she over-exercised. She would exercise in intense heat to sweat more pounds off. Her parents began to see her lose interest in food. So she began to hide it very well.

She would take laxatives to lose weight. She would work during meal times to not have to eat with the family. She became very good at hiding her disorder. She even hid rat poison in her bedroom. Instead of getting better, she got better at hiding her anorexia.

She said these are thoughts I was thinking, “I am never going to be thin enough, and I am never going to be good enough,” throughout the entire eight years of her battle. Her self-image was not based on God’s lens but through her filter of not being good enough or thin enough.

Tina got worse and worse. Her non-eating and exercise led to terrible consequences. Desperate to be thin at all cost!

But God had a plan of healing. Tina became pregnant, and it saved her from anorexia! 

The darts of the anorexia disorder attacked Tina, but God unexpectedly delivered her! After she found out she would have a baby, she began to take care of the baby inside of her and started to eat healthily. She focused on her baby!

Tina then became immersed in God because something beyond her was vital. She began to focus on God first. She began to look at her life as a mother and a parent. She studied God’s word to give her statements of value and worth.

It takes a process. It takes time to heal. This is not a one and done with this eating disorder mindset. This takes time to unravel. Here are some tips to overcome anorexia:

  1. Get Christian counseling offering spiritual help as well physical help expediting healing 
  2. Every story is different, so all of them can be worked through with prayer, believing God will deliver and heal anorexia
  3. Address medical issues along with counseling to prevent long-term medical problems

Tina shares that one of the essential tips she can give us is to have deep conversations with your teen or young adult if you suspect anorexia. If we don’t try to address the issue, they can continue hiding it. This is the best way to start the journey of healing. 


Laine’s Resources

WEBSITE: https://www.LaineLawsonCraft.com

FREE “IS LIFE HURTING TOO MUCH” E-BOOK: https://LaineLawsonCraft.ac-page.com/hurting

DOWNLOAD FREE: 5 Warfare Prayers for Your Prodigal: https://LaineLawsonCraft.ac-page.com/5-warfare-prayers

Social Links

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What You Need to Know About Anorexia

Many teens and young adults struggle with eating disorders. In this Anorexia series, we will dig deep into the conversation about anorexia, read a powerful testimony of overcoming anorexia, and discover resources to help heal anorexia. Tina Yeager, LMHC, an award-winning author, speaker, podcast host, and life coach, is on all three episodes of the Warfare Parenting Podcast. You can listen here. Please be sure and comment and leave your thoughts on the Warfare Parenting Blog!

What is Anorexia?

Anorexia is an eating disorder that affects mainly girls. The average girl develops anorexia at age sixteen to seventeen. Teen girls between the ages of thirteen and nineteen and young women in their early twenties are at most risk. Eighty-five percent of anorexics have onset of the disorder between thirteen and eighteen.

What influences teenagers at risk for anorexia?

Stress and significant life change factor into the disorder risk. Dysfunctional family environments and peer pressure play a role. Negative messages from culture and media can also impact and influence the disorder.

What are signs that our teen or young adult may have anorexia?

There are several psychological signs, and they can include: perfectionism. Obsessive thinking, difficulty expressing emotions and feelings, history of trauma or abuse, low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and lack of healthy coping strategies.

Some physical signs of anorexia are: they don’t eat enough, are underweight, obsessed with gaining weight, hard to sleep at night, dizzy, fainting, hair falling out, period stops, constipation, and self-esteem are based on the way their body looks.

If you suspect your teen or young adult may have anorexia, please open up the conversation loving and non-confrontational. Our third blog will have many resources on how to find help if you think your teen or young adult may have anorexia. After opening the conversation, schedule a check-up with the doctor to rule out any other underlying factors. Then the doctor can help you find options for treatment.


Laine’s Resources

WEBSITE: https://www.LaineLawsonCraft.com

FREE “IS LIFE HURTING TOO MUCH” E-BOOK: https://LaineLawsonCraft.ac-page.com/hurting

DOWNLOAD FREE: 5 Warfare Prayers for Your Prodigal: https://LaineLawsonCraft.ac-page.com/5-warfare-prayers

Social Links

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/LaineLawsonCraft

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/LaineLawsonCrft

IG: https://www.instagram.com/LaineLawsonCraft

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/lainelawsoncraft