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Resources for Suicidal Teens and Parents

In the last few blogs, we’ve talked about a tough subject, suicide, and suicidal thoughts, with Lori Wildenberg. We first started the conversation with what is suicide and what are suicidal thoughts. Then we shared Lori giving her powerful testimony about how her daughter, who had an unsuccessful suicide attempt and now is thriving and doing great. We have shown risk factors and signs to look for in children. Today we conclude with a few lasting points and resources.

Keys to Overcoming Suicide and Suicidal Thoughts

One of the keys to overcoming suicide and suicidal thoughts is to stay connected and communicate. Many times this can be something we tend to avoid because this is a tough subject to talk about with our kids. We are reluctant to go to a child we love and ask the hard question, “Have you thought about suicide” and not want to hear the answer that they may be depressed or thinking about suicide.

Another key truth is that positivity can be toxic because it feels dismissive. If our kids come to us with genuine concern, and we dismiss it and put a positive spin on it, we’re telling them we don’t want to hear their struggle, to get over it, and that there’s always a silver lining. What is more important than positivity is giving the reality that life can be hard. God is still good, but life is hard. We need to let our children know that there are struggles and understand that it’s not always going to be what it might look like on social media. Life is hard, and it’s filled with hard things, and that’s not such a bad thing that it is filled with hard things. We need to explain that if we think about it, in sadness, when we experience sadness, which draws up compassion, and if a person feels fear, this can draw up bravery in a person. Anger can help someone get to a place where they do some problem-solving. Everyone likes happiness; happy is excellent; no one’s going to argue that, but our kids will live a full life, so we want to ensure that we equip them for that full life.

Another key is that fear and worry can kick into anxiety, and sadness can kick into depression, which can kick into suicidal ideation. So, watch if our kids are feeling sad; if it’s temporary, that’s typical, temporary if they can still express joy in their grief and sadness. For example,  let’s say that maybe a grandparent has passed away; if they can still recall a funny story and laugh and enjoy things still, even during the grief, if you can see that, what you know is your child is experiencing sadness, not depression. But if sadness continues for some time, you need help. Some studies say even if there’s no joy, if it’s only sadness for a few weeks, get help; others say a little longer. But I would say you know your child and watch for when help needs to come.

The last key today is if we feel like our child may be sad or depressed and possibly have suicidal thoughts treat it now. Look at it like your child has some illness or physical sickness; you would seek help whether your child wanted it or not, right? Even if they didn’t want help and broke their leg, you would still go to the doctor to get their legs set. So we move forward as responsible parents; we don’t wait for them to say, Yes, I’m ready for help. We get help. We go to the doctor, we go to the pediatrician, and we find a therapist.

I pray that these informative and moving conversations on suicide and suicidal thoughts in our children have touched you and have helped bring light to the dark topic.

Listen to the Warfare Parenting Podcast today and don’ forget to visit LoriWildenberg.com and find many more resources.

Another resource: National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, is 1- 800-273-Talk


Links + Resources:

WEBSITE: https://www.LaineLawsonCraft.com

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DOWNLOAD FREE: Warfare Prayers – Laine Lawson Craft

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FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/LaineLawsonCraft

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/LaineLawsonCrft

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https://lainelawsoncraft.com/warfare-prayers/

 

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Unsuccessful Suicide Story

Unsuccessful suicide attempts are a tough topic to talk about. We have been discussing suicide and suicidal thoughts in these last blogs and Warfare Parenting Podcast. Today, Lori Wildenberg shares her personal experience with her daughter’s unsuccessful suicide attempt.

This is Lori’s story.

Lori shared, “You know this, this is a tough topic. In the last episode, we talked about some of the signs demonstrating that perhaps the depression is getting deeper and could lead to suicide. And my daughter had some of those signs when she was younger, in middle school; she wrestled with an eating disorder. By the time she went to college, I had thought she was emotionally healthy. She started well. Then there was a lot of pressure with the particular major that she was in. It was a high-pressure major. So she had all the stress of the workload of college. She was also working a little bit, earning some extra spending money. She had some friendships that were getting somewhat difficult. All of those stressors started to keep piling on and piling on. 

Then the feelings of I would say she was feeling alone, or even feeling worthless, or perhaps feeling like she wasn’t ever really loved. All of which, I mean, if she were to stop and think about it, but your brain isn’t right when you’re going through these things, right? So she was wrestling with a lot of things and it started to get too much. When I would call her, at first, I could hear the sadness in her voice. Later, I found out that she was crying like every night. I didn’t know this. When we talked, she was four hours away, so it wasn’t like we were close. But we still had the phone, and I could hear the sadness in her voice. 

But, then I have to tell you, the scariest thing was hearing her voice void of emotion when I talked to her. That scared me. It was like my daughter would be like, I don’t care if a good thing happened to me, it doesn’t matter if a bad thing happens to me, I don’t feel anything. This was incredibly frightening. Well, after one of those calls, I got pretty scared, and I made a plan to go and see her, and I was going the next day. 

Well, the night before she attempted to take her life, she ended up telling me later. But I didn’t know that she had an unsuccessful attempt at the time. If you read my book, you’ll learn a little bit more about that. But I’d instead not get into that part of it. It is in the book because my daughter describes her own experience, and I leave that up to her. The book’s title is “Messy Hope Help Your Child Overcome Anxiety, Depression or Suicidal Ideation”. 

So when she came home with me, then the next thing was we went to the doctor. She got on a prescription to help stabilize some of the things that were going on with her and then made a plan for doing some therapy. All of those things help. Yet I think that one of the things that helped the most was graduation which was maybe six months from then. She ended up graduating from college. Then many of those triggers, the things triggering her, fell away, and she continued to get healthier and healthier, and everybody’s different. But I do know everybody needs help, and as parents, we can be a tool to provide more hope and help for our kids. God can use us in that

About two years, maybe a year and a half after her attempt, she wrote a blog about her experience and depression. She wrote it to help somebody else who may be feeling like she was, about 18 months to two years ago. The blog was a tough one to read. I almost felt like I was going to be sick, you know, to hear the things that she was thinking and the way that she even thought about herself. It was very troubling. But when I read her blog, God started to impress upon me that her blog was so important for young people to read. 

But there was another side that parents needed to be equipped. Because young people today are struggling with so many mental health things, one in four will end up with a mental health diagnosis. This is what God had; part of her healing journey was writing her blog and participating in writing messy hope with me. I have to say; I wasn’t sure about God’s plan. I was really scared about his plan because I thought, Lord, what if this because I’m asking her these questions, and she’s drawing up these past emotions? What if this puts her back into that black hole with all the layers? Right? What if this starts to heap dirt on top of her again? You know, I’m afraid to do this. And I kept checking in with her; how are you doing? Are you okay? 

Finally, at one point, when I asked her, because I was really scared, and I asked her if she was alright, she went, “You know, it’s really hard, mom, for me to relate to that person that I was then to who I am today.” Wow, there’s the victory. 

There is much more for you in this week’s Warfare parenting Podcast. Please listen here today.

You can also buy Lori’s book, which shares many applications, tools, and more. For more information, please visit her website here.

LINKS & RESOURCES

WEBSITE: https://www.LaineLawsonCraft.com

DOWNLOAD FREE: Warfare Prayers – Laine Lawson Craft

SOCIAL 

FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/LaineLawsonCraft

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/LaineLawsonCrft

IG: https://www.instagram.com/LaineLawsonCraft

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/lainelawsoncraft

https://lainelawsoncraft.com/warfare-prayers/

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Keys to Prevent Suicide

Today we begin the three-part series on suicidal thoughts and suicide. Lori Wildenberg is here with me for the next three episodes, helping us understand suicide and suicidal thoughts in a greater capacity. In our next episode, Lori has her own personal story that we will hear and read about. She is the author of “Messy Hope: Help Your Child Overcome Anxiety, Depression, or Suicidal Ideation.” I know you will want to hear and be a part of the upcoming episodes on suicide. 

Today I  pray that you find more insight and everything you need to know about this complicated subject,  suicide, and suicidal thoughts. 

The frightening stats of the increase in suicide are hard to digest. Here are some up-to-date statistics that will help us understand more:

Teenage girl’s hospital admissions that have attempted suicide are up 50%

The second leading cause of death in this age group

Young men are more successful in taking their lives in suicide attempts

In Colorado alone, the number one cause of death in teenagers and young adults is suicide

The essential part of today’s insights is whether we know if our teen or young adult may be considering suicide or have suicidal thoughts? We can look for these warning signs:

Psychological disorders like depression or bipolar

Drug and alcohol abuse

Agitated, hopeless, irritable, worthless feelings, family history, physical or sexual abuse

Some situational influences can increase suicidal thoughts if a relationship breakup with a girlfriend or boyfriend—a family who has recently gone through a divorce. We need to look deep into circumstances that could increase our teens’ anxiety, sadness, or emotional state.

One of the most significant warning signs to look for is making irrational decisions that make no sense—for example, deciding not to go back to school. If you ask yourself why they are acting like this and making this decision, an extremely irrational decision, this is a significant warning sign.

My friend Lori shares, “My youngest daughter was at college and suffered and struggled with depression. And she called me up and said that she would pack up all her stuff. She would move home, and she would commute to school, okay, commuting to school. The school was four hours away. All right now, she would have an eight-hour commute. That didn’t make any sense. She had quit her job just because it appeared to be on a whim. She impulsively quit her job, packed up her stuff, and made impulsive decisions. 

In the suicidal series episode 2, Lori shares her personal story of how her daughter had an unsuccessful suicide attempt and how they found healing.

Since Covid suicides have gone up 30%, these are frightening statistics for parents of teens and young adults. There is one essential key to knowing what your teen or young adult may be thinking.

The key to knowing our teens and young adults are free of suicidal thoughts is to ask them! And we’ve got to be asking our kids, how are you doing and specifically, How are you doing today? Ask them specifically so that they know that you’re ready for that answer. Ask them I’d like to pray for you. How can I pray? That’s another thing that could lead to more insight into their feelings, but we’ve got to start asking our kids the tough, awful question, “Have you considered taking your life?” That’s a horrible question to ask. But if you’re thinking about that, chances are pretty good that your child has already thought about it. And then they know that you’re ready to have that conversation with them, and they don’t have to protect you.

I have a passion for that question. Because if we don’t ask it, we may regret it because we feel that maybe they are thinking of it. And so I encourage everybody, if you believe your child, your teen young adult, may be thinking about suicide, ask them how you are doing today and ask the most challenging question, “Have you considered taking your life?”

I pray that this helps you as a parent today of teens and young adults learning all about suicidal thoughts.

The most important takeaway is staying connected to our teens and young adults, specifically our prodigal children. These keys will help us see warning signs and better communicate with them. 

LINKS & RESOURCES

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WEBSITE: https://www.LaineLawsonCraft.com

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DOWNLOAD FREE: Warfare Prayers – Laine Lawson Craft

SOCIAL ===============================

FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/LaineLawsonCraft

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/LaineLawsonCrft

IG: https://www.instagram.com/LaineLawsonCraft

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/lainelawsoncraft

https://lainelawsoncraft.com/warfare-prayers/

About the Author:

Lori Wildenberg

LoriWildenberg.com